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Are You Being Called By Credit Bureau of the High Plains?*

Stop The Harassment

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Are you being called by Credit Bureau of the High Plains?* Here's what you need to know

The average American household carries a credit card balance of $15,000. Given average interest rates, they apply a large percentage of their income to interest payments alone. When they are no longer able to keep up, their accounts may be transferred to third-party debt collectors, and not all of them will be civil in their payment demands.

Your Rights Under the FDCPA

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, or FDCPA, regulates what third party debt collectors may say and do while trying to collect a debt from you. Actions that involve bullying, threats, and deception are prohibited and can cause an agency to lose its license. For example:

  • Calling at inconvenient times, namely before 8:00 a.m. and after 9:00 p.m. in your time zone
  • Telling you that you have committed a crime like fraud and will be arrested
  • Persisting in trying to collect a disputed debt
  • Failing or refusing to identify themselves as debt collectors in every communication
  • Discussing the debt with your family, friends, and co-workers
  • Reporting false information to the credit bureaus

Is Credit Bureau of the High Plains Calling You?

Company Profile: Credit Bureau of the High Plains

If you are being called by Credit Bureau of the High Plains, information about the company is below.

Credit Bureau of the High Plains is a debt collection company located in Canyon, Texas. It was established in 1968, has less than 10 employees, and is managed by its President, Donna Mcwaters. A review of lawsuit records retained by the PACER (Public Access to Court Electronic Records) website indicates that people who felt they were being harassed by Credit Bureau of the High Plains rebuffed all demands for payment and fought back in court.

Alleged Violations against Credit Bureau of the High Plains

According to PACER, in or around late 2012, Credit Bureau of the High Plains began reporting a consumer debt allegedly owed by a Texas resident to the credit bureaus. She later insisted that the debt was being reported to pressure her into paying.

Feeling harassed by Credit Bureau of the High Plains, she hired a consumer attorney and sued the company for allegedly violating the FDCPA in the following ways:

The matter was later settled.

Hire an Attorney

The phone numbers for this debt collection agency are as follows:

  • 1-806-655-2123
  • 1-800-658-9294

If you see either number on your caller ID when the phone rings, it means that you are being called by Credit Bureau of the High Plains. If they report derogatory information to the credit bureaus to pressure you into paying, hire a consumer attorney who can help you protect your rights. If you opt to file a claim against Credit Bureau of the High Plains for harassing you, you may win $1,000 per FDCPA violation, so never be afraid to exercise the rights that the law gives you. Standing up for yourself could force a debt collector to owe you money instead.

*Case taken from PACER (www.pacer.gov). File number is Case 4:12-cv-00720-RC-AM from the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas.

Disclaimer: The content of this article serves only to provide information and should not be constructed as legal advice. If you file a claim against Credit Bureau of the High Plains, or any other third-party collection agency, you may not be entitled to any compensation.